By: Compost Girl

My husband and I are both pretty conscious of the things we’re putting in the waste stream and we try to buy organic as much as possible, but after watching Food, Inc., we can’t go to the grocery store without cringing.  Desire to change and practical application of that desire are two different things, though, as it is so far a pretty hard thing to do.  Maybe it’s a more of a process than anything.

So, we’re getting chickens.  Yes, we live in one of the biggest cities in the country, so it seems a little odd in a way, but it also seems like a perfect fit, as we keep trying to avoid the cost – both the monetary and ethical – of eggs from chickens that haven’t been tortured in some subtle way.  Since we would get eggs, a garbage disposal, pest control and a free source of fertilizer, this should be a pretty healthy step toward in a positive direction.  After building costs, the mail-order chick delivery, food, etc., I can see that the eggs are going to cost at least $35 each, but if I wake up every day and feel better, it will be worth it.

To see what we’re getting into, we’re going to Portland for the Tour de Coops, as I can’t think of a “crunchier” environment to start.  The only place that has more Birkenstocks per square foot is Davis, but we missed that one, so Portland is it (damn – now I’ll have to go to Powell’s).  Rick (my husband) is running the camera, Jeannie (my good friend) has decided to join our quest for chicken freedom, and we’re going to document our endeavors.

Three worm bins and two composters now, chickens to follow.  We’re either on the road to heaven or Hell – we’ll soon see which.  As long as I don’t end up divorced after the next two “Honey – I found a new thing for us to try” projects, I’ll consider it a success.

Baby Chicks